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Thursday 15 November

STATE LIBRARY OF NSW, Sydney

9:00am—Welcome

9:30am—Session 1

TALKING UP STRIFE: THE RHETORIC OF CLASH OF CIVLISATIONS

A panel will look at the role the media have played in reinforcing divisive rhetoric in Australia and beyond, especially between European and non-European cultures and religions. It questions the dominant characterisation of clashes as religious or cultural, obscuring other motives which might be in play, especially the competition for economic resources.

11:30am—Session 2

CULTURE WARS: WHERE ARE WE NOW?

The term ‘culture wars’ has been a rhetorical device for explaining divisions between various groups in Australia and the world for the past 50 or so years. Oppositions like Western/Eastern, religious/secular and Christian/Muslim have all been useful to those who have sought to promote social disunity. This panel questions these oppositions and seeks to frame them within the wider debate over the clash of civilisations.

2:00pm—Session 3

ANCIENT CONFLICTS: PAST MEETS PRESENT

Clashes between religions and cultures of the past have real implications for today’s attempts to defend territorial rights, freedom of religion and freedom of movement or, in some cases, to destroy these rights. The speakers will consider the clashes between ancient cultures and new arrivals: pagans with Christians in classical Greco-Roman society, indigenous Australians with European settlers, and Christians with Muslims in ancient Syria, and the impact of these clashes on social cohesion in those areas today.


Thursday 15 November

4:00pm—The 49th Academy Lecture

Every year the Academy invites a Fellow to deliver the annual Academy Lecture. Since 1970, this tradition has demonstrated the extraordinary breadth and depth of our Fellows’ contribution to the Australian and international humanities community, and to enriching the cultural life of the nation.

The 49th Academy Lecture will be presented by Professor Julianne Schultz AM FAHA acclaimed author, journalist, cultural and communication studies academic and the founding editor of Griffith Review

This is a free event, open to the public.

5:00pm—Reception

Hosted by Macquarie University. 


Friday 16 November

STATE LIBRARY OF NSW, Sydney

9:00amIntroduction

9:15am—Session 4

IDENTITY POLITICS

The politics of identity, whether ethnic, cultural, religious, or racial, has been a major complication in multi-cultural Australian development over the course of its history. 

11:30am—Session 5

LANGUAGES, THE ARTS AND CULTURAL CONFLICT/COLLABORATION

Artistic and linguistic expression are two important aspects of multi-culturalism in Australia and beyond. Visual and audio arts show the potential for inter-cultural conflict or its opposite, creative collaboration and crossover, while recognition of linguistic minorities has an equally important role in the integration of communities.


Friday 16 November

1:00pm—The 8th Hancock Lecture

This lecture series invites young Australian scholars of excellence to talk about their work with a broader audience. The lecture series is made possible through a bequest from the estate of Sir (William) Keith Hancock KBE FAHA and is usually delivered every three to four years.

The 8th Hancock Lecture will be given by early career Arab and Islamic Studies scholar, Dr Raihan Ismail from the Australian National University.

This is a free event, open to the public.

2:00pm—Symposium close


About the image

‘European Thousand-Armed Classical Sculpture’ by Xu Zhen (Madein), 2014. Appears courtesy of the artist and White Rabbit Gallery, Sydney.